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Regular Exercise Can Slow Ageing Process

Biological ageing is estimated by measuring the number of shortening telomeres in cells. Telomeres are the protective end-caps of DNA strands, and they shorten each time a cell divides until they become so short that they no longer protect DNA instructions properly and cells stop dividing or die prematurely. This cell loss is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other diseases associated with ageing.

Therefore, telomere length acts as a marker for how old someone really is on the inside, as opposed to their chronological age which measures how many years somebody has lived since their birthday.”

We all know that exercise is important for a healthy lifestyle. Exercise can help prevent depression, improve sleep, and boost energy levels.

Exercise can also slow ageing. Studies have suggested that regular aerobic activity can slow down the ageing process by reducing the rate at which our cells age. Muscle mass declines with age, but those who exercise regularly are able to preserve their muscle mass.

Lifestyle can help slow the ageing process.

new study has found that an active lifestyle can help slow the ageing process. Age is not just determined by your date of birth; it is also determined by changes in your cells over time. These changes are called biological age or biological clock and they measure how fast or slow you are ageing on the inside. It is thought that your biological age can determine your overall health and life expectancy.

Ageing is the process of getting older. Ageing is not just a number, but also a process. This can be influenced by many factors, including lifestyle and genetics.

Ageing is associated with several diseases including heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease which results in significant loss of quality of life in elderly patients.

Exercise has the power to lower your biological age

Researchers have found that exercise has the power to lower your biological age. Unlike chronological age, which is based on when you were born, biological age measures how old you are internally. Biological ageing is estimated by measuring the number of shortening telomeres in cells. Telomeres are the protective end caps of DNA strands, and they shorten each time a cell divides until they become so short that they no longer protect DNA instructions properly and cells stop dividing or die prematurely. This cell loss is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other diseases associated with ageing.

A healthy lifestyle, including a balanced diet and regular exercise, is the best way to reduce your biological age. Research has shown that being physically active can increase lifespan by as much as 20 years

Exercise can also prevent or delay the onset of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Therefore, telomere length acts as a marker for how old someone really is on the inside, as opposed to their chronological age, which measures how many years somebody has lived since their birthday.

As cells divide, the telomeres shorten each time. When they become so short that they no longer protect DNA instructions properly and cells stop dividing or die prematurely, it’s a sign of ageing. Therefore, telomere length acts as a marker for how old someone really is on the inside, as opposed to their chronological age, which measures how many years somebody has lived since their birthday.

But not all scientists agree with this theory: “It’s an interesting hypothesis, and there could be some truth in it,” says Dr Richard Faragher from Brighton University Hospitals NHS Trust in England, who studies telomeres but was not involved in this research. “But I think we’ve got quite a way to go before we can say whether physical activity actually does influence your risk of getting heart disease or osteoporosis.”

Dr. Joseph Leach is a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and he’s also a professor of physiology and pharmacology at the Mayo Medical School. He is the director of the Center for Aging and Metabolism Research and has done extensive research on ageing. Dr Leach talks about how exercise can slow down or prevent ageing, including some tips to get started if you’re not someone who exercises regularly.

How much exercise do you need?

The amount of exercise you need is determined by your age, health, and fitness level. The National Institute on Aging recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise per week for adults aged 65 and older. This can be broken down into two sessions of 75 minutes each (150 minutes total) or three sessions of 50 minutes each (150 minutes total).

Different types of exercise have different effects on your body as you age.

In the same way, different types of exercise have different effects on your body as you age. A 2018 study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, had a positive effect on muscle strength and endurance for older adults. Meanwhile, moderate-intensity cardio — such as walking at a brisk pace — can help improve cardiovascular health, according to an article published in Harvard Health Publishing. And yoga has been shown to help improve flexibility and balance among older adults struggling with mobility issues due to arthritis or other chronic conditions.

Why exercise helps to keep us young.

  • Exercise helps to keep your heart and blood vessels healthy.
  • Exercise helps to keep your bones strong.
  • Exercise helps to keep your muscles strong.
  • Exercise helps to keep your weight down.
  • Exercise helps to keep your brain healthy.

Exercise also helps in other ways: it can reduce stress, improve sleep, boost mood, and help people feel more motivated and confident about themselves!

Challenge your body, and embrace the health and mental benefits exercise brings with it.

Exercise is good for your body and your mind. It can help you live longer, combat disease, and improve your sleep.

If you don’t already enjoy exercising, then I suggest starting with something small. Walk to work instead of taking a bus or train; join a gym if it’s affordable; or start doing some yoga at home (I like Yoga with Adriene on Youtube).

The most important thing is to find an activity that you really enjoy so that you won’t feel like you are forcing yourself to do something positive for your health.

Conclusion

It is thought that lower telomere length might be linked to a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other diseases associated with ageing. Therefore, it is important that we understand how exercise can help protect against this cell loss. Telomeres are important to our health because they protect the ends of our chromosomes and help prevent damage. As we age, our cells lose their ability to repair DNA damage and maintain telomeres. This leads to cell dysfunction and ageing-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

If you’re ready to start an exercise program, it’s important that you find one that works for you. Book an appointment with one of our trained exercise physiologists today, and we’ll help you find the right program for your needs!

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